Tag Archives | religion laws

INDIA: Anti-Conversion Legislation Expanding

The North Indian state of Uttarkhand is now the seventh state in the country to pass legislation restricting religious conversions, particularly from Hinduism to Christianity. This law carries a jail term of up to two years. Passed by the state assembly in March, and signed

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CHINA: Christians Monitored by Government Officials

A Christian in the Zhoukou area of Henan province said that under new government restrictions, area churches are required to sing the Chinese national anthem at the beginning of each service and a nationalistic song titled “No Communist Party, No New China” at the end

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NewsletterP5

China: Persecution is our Reality

“Would you stand up in your church and teach about persecution?” Pastor Wang answered, “Yes I would! As a matter of fact I have done it a lot recently because of the new regulations. I have spoken to both leaders and believers. Persecution is our

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NewsletterP3

New Religious Ordinance

A new religious ordinance took effect in China on 1 February, with the stated intent of implementing greater controls to “eradicate extremism” in the interest of national security. Under the ordinance, organisers of unapproved religious activities and anyone providing a venue for illegal religious events

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China

CHINA: Increased Pressure on House Church Gatherings

According to Christians in China’s central Henan province, the local public security bureaus and religious affairs bureaus have started targeting house church members with threats and fines since early February. A new initiative in Nanyang, Henan, explicitly forbids any kind of religious gatherings in people’s

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vietnam

VIETNAM: New Religion Law Fuels Christians’ Fears

Vietnam’s Law on Belief and Religion, which came into force on 1 January has alarmed Christians. It insists religious groups must be registered and approved by the government. They also believe that the law’s vague wording could be exploited to limit church activities. Despite some

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